If you follow the news at all, you’ve likely heard about Samsung’s troubles. First, it was the cellphones; consumers reported experienced alarming trouble with their smartphones, some overheating, smoking, catching fire and even exploding. Things got so bad that the phones were banned entirely from commercial airplanes. It now looks like things are only going to get worse for the Korean technology company after it announced this week that it will recall nearly 3 million washing machines. What’s the trouble? Concerns about exploding washers.

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Samsung’s troubles began months ago when reports started trickling in that the new Galaxy Note 7 was overheating. Since the first reports of problems, dozens of people have come forward saying the lithium-ion batteries in their phones can overheat, leading to fires and explosions. The crisis is bad enough that Samsung recalled millions of the phones and, after several scary incidents, airlines banned passengers from bringing them onboard.

The issue with the washing machines impacts a wide range of products across 34 models of top-loading washers. According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, the concern is that the top of the washing machine can unexpectedly detach from the base, posing a risk to consumers of injury from impact.

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When you think of personal injury cases and the factors that contribute to higher verdicts, you likely focus on things like the severity of the injuries suffered, whether there is permanent damage and whether the defendant was especially reckless or grossly negligent. Though these are important factors, a recent article in Business Insider mentions another few considerations many people overlook: race and gender.

Though we might instinctively believe that things like race or gender shouldn’t have anything to do personal injury damages, studies indicate that they absolutely do. In fact, experts say that if a young black girl and a young white boy both suffered the exact same injuries, perhaps due to lead poisoning, it’s quite possible that the white boy would walk away with millions more dollars in personal injury damages than the black girl.

Your first question will likely be, why is this true? Are the courts simply discriminating? Well, the answer is a bit complicated. To understand why the results are so different based on race and gender, we have to discuss one important component of personal injury damage awards: lost future earnings. If a person has been seriously injured, it is almost always the case that their lawyer will ask for compensation for the money the person would’ve earned in his or her life. This can represent a sizable chunk of the damages awarded.

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Though serious car accidents happen every day and each one is a tragedy, an especially horrifying example occurred in Mississippi this Halloween. According to authorities, what was supposed to be a fun and festive hayride ended in three fatalities and seven injuries after a pickup truck smashed into the back of a trailer full of people.

News reports indicate the Halloween hayride included 10 people, several of whom were from the Shaver family. Kristina Shaver was on the ride with her three daughters and her sister, Melissa Cook, and her children. According to police, Kristina Shaver and two of her daughters died due to injuries sustained in the crash. Even more tragic, Shaver’s husband was killed in a car accident earlier this summer, leaving Kristina Shaver’s middle daughter as the only surviving member of her immediate family. Officials say that the young girl is in critical condition at the University of Mississippi Medical center.

Those living nearby recounted the accident, saying that earlier in the evening they remember the group from the hayride stopping by and trick-or-treating. The trailer would unload and the kids would go door-to-door, piling back in the trailer to move to a new location. One couple remembers seeing the Shaver family and then worrying a little while later when they heard the emergency response vehicles in the distance. Soon after the sirens went by the couple saw three helicopters landing in a nearby baseball field, all signs of a very serious accident.

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When you think of dangerous jobs, the first thing that likely comes to your mind is something like police officer or a firefighter, something daring and dangerous. You likely wouldn’t think of nursing home aide or fish farming, neither seeming to be especially death defying. Though they may not sound like particularly terrifying professions, the latest survey by the U.S. Labor Department indicates they are among the most dangerous jobs for workers in terms of the number of on-the-job injuries. To learn more, keep reading.

According to the Labor Department survey, there were about 2.9 million nonfatal workplace accidents and injuries last year in the private sector. Public sector jobs accounted for an additional 750,000. These numbers mean that three of every 100 full-time employees suffered some form of injury or illness due to their work.

It’s important to remember that these rates are averages, and that the rates for individual professions can vary widely. For instance, those working in the aquaculture industry, meaning those responsible for fish farming, have the highest rate of non-deadly injury, coming in at a whopping 13.6 injuries per 100 full-time workers, several times more than average.

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Pokémon Go has swept the country and the world in the past month, with millions of users downloading the app. The game has gotten particular attention because it’s the first widely successful use of a technology known as augmented reality. This allows users to be inside a game while viewing the real outside world. Though visually interesting, some have raised questions about whether the app might be to blame for causing injuries to users. Given recent reports of harm to players, legal experts say it’s all but inevitable that personal injury claims will result. To learn more about such potential claims, keep reading.

First, there have been reports in recent weeks of a multitude of injuries occurring to players of Pokémon Go. News reports indicate that serious accidents occurred in California, New York and Pennsylvania to name a few. People have been injured walking into traffic, walking off cliffs and entering buildings or places they shouldn’t have been in. These injuries are precisely what could cause users to sue Niantic Inc., the developer and publisher of Pokémon Go.

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One person died and several others suffered serious injuries after a chain reaction crash in Mississippi involving three tractor-trailers. The accident demonstrates not only the potential for serious harm posed by semi trucks, but also the danger that exists when one wreck occurs, increasingly the likelihood that other vehicles are drawn into the collision.

According to officials from Mississippi Highway Patrol, the accident happened in the eastbound lanes of I-20 and resulted in the death of Billy Robinson, a 48-year-old UPS driver from Alabama. The man was a 29-year employee of UPS and thus had nearly three decades of experiencing operating large tractor-trailers under his belt.

All his years of experience were sadly not enough to avoid the terrible accident that occurred early that morning, a little after 4, in Newton County, MS. Law enforcement authorities say the crash involved three 18-wheelers and happened near the 99 mile marker. All three of the semis were heading east when one of the trucks crashed into another from behind. That accident then caused a chain reaction and the UPS truck driven by Robinson ran into the back of the second truck. Police say there was likely not enough time to react quickly and avoid the first collision. The cause of that first accident remains unknown, though police investigators are working on the case.

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Most parents spend time and money trying to pick out just the right stroller, reading reviews or asking for recommendations from friends and family members. The hope is that by spending energy hunting down the best stroller, you increase the likelihood your child is safe and sound when out for a walk.

While strollers are generally safe when used properly, a point that should be underlined given the alarming new research, experts say that strollers may be more dangerous than some parents might think. Strollers can actually cause serious harm in some cases, especially when parents don’t know how to use the strollers properly.

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If you’ve been injured, whether at work, in a car accident, at a store, the advice is the same: be exceedingly careful what you post on social media. Even seemingly routine interactions online can be twisted and used against you by an insurance company or defense attorney. Before you know it, a status update, private message or fun photograph could be the thing that undermines your personal injury claim. To learn more about the dangers of social media on personal injury cases, keep reading.

For one thing, social media posts can be used to undermine claims of physical injury. If you’ve been hurt and have filed a claim, you are likely asking for compensation related to medical bills as well as compensation for noneconomic harm, such as pain and suffering related to your physical injury. You’d be surprised just how easily social media posts can undercut such claims. A real life example happened in the case of a woman who sued after a rear-end car collision left her seriously injured. The defense attorneys scoured her Facebook profile and discovered a photograph of her dancing with her brother after the accident had occurred. The defense argued this photo proved not only that she wasn’t suffering from a serious physical injury, but that she had experienced no loss of enjoyment of life. The judge agreed and ruled against the plaintiff.
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When summer rolls around it almost results in more yard work. It’s sunny and hot, the grass is green and that means it’s time to get out the lawnmower. Though lawn maintenance is typically uneventful, that is sadly not always the case and it can come as a real shock when something as simple as mowing the grass turns deadly. That’s just what happened this past week in Mississippi, where two incidents involving lawnmowers left one man seriously injured and another dead.

The first incident occurred in Yazoo City, MS, earlier this week when a man died in a lawnmower accident. According to police, the man, Ronnie Warren, was operating a zero-turn mower to cut grass. The homeowners say they noticed later in the evening that something was wrong when they realized that they hadn’t seen Warren in some time. They left their house to see if they could find him and discovered that Warren was trapped under the mower.
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You wouldn’t ordinarily think that something like workers’ compensation benefit guides could be sexist. After all, an injury is an injury, so it shouldn’t matter the gender of the person being impacted by it. A recent lawsuit in California aims to challenge that idea, arguing that the state’s workers’ comp system is not only sexist, but deeply so, and that it has been consistently discriminating against women by undervaluing the harm they suffer.

The case at issue was filed on behalf of several women in Los Angeles County. The plaintiffs are attempting to receive class action certification and bring a claim representing thousands more women. Two of the women involved in the initial lawsuit are former police officers who both received mastectomies. In one instance, the officer said she developed breast cancer due to exposure to toxins, something a medical evaluator agreed with. Though the injury was deemed work-related, the disability guide used by California said that there is no permanent impairment due to the loss of a woman’s breast.
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